We are in the process of developing and improving our website, and we invite you to participate in our brief survey to measure the level of your satisfaction
Satisfaction Survey For UAE Interact Website
رغبة منا بالتعرف على مستوى رضاكم عن موقعنا وبهدف تطويره وتحسينه، فقد قمنا بتصميم استبيان سريع لقياس مدى الرضا عن موقع دولة الإمارات العربية المتحدة روعي في تصميم الاستبيان أن يكون قصيرا وسريعا كي لا نطيل عليكم، وعليه نرجو منكم التكرم باستكماله عن طريق الرابط التالي
استبيان رضا المتعاملين عن موقع دولة الإمارات العربية المتحدة


 
  UAE History - Ancient artifacts
J
ewellery
 
 
There are practically no archaeological sites in the U.A.E. which have not yielded some remains, however meagre, of human adornment. Sites from the late Stone Age (6th-4th millennium B.C.) are often replete with beads of shell, bone and stone which would have once been strung in necklaces and bracelets. Marine shells and mother-of-pearl were sometimes artfully carved; imported stones like agate and carnelian from the Indus Valley (particularly from Gujarat) were highly sought after. Precious metals, including gold and silver, are present in small quantities and can be seen in the museums of Fujairah and Ras al-Khaimah. The recovery of nearly 13,000 beads in the late 3rd millennium tomb at Al-Sufouh in Dubai (the finds from which can be seen in the Dubai Museum) gives us an indication of just how much jewellery was used to adorn the dead of the region during the Bronze Age.

There is some suggestion that magical amulets may have played a part in jewellery as well. Early Islamic writers provide a considerable amount of information on the magical properties of amulets worn by men, women and children - amulets used as charms against disease, the evil-eye, to bring good luck, etc. Steatite pendants, probably worn around the neck as centrepieces in necklaces, have been found at a number of Iron Age sites in the U.A.E. and may have served a similar function. The Indus Valley, which had a prodigious industry in the manufacture of steatite and faience micro-beads (so-called because of their minute size), exported thousands of such beads to other parts of the Near East, including southeastern Arabia.
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : TOYS
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : TOOLS
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : HERITAGE
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : WEAPONS
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : JEWELLERY
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : STONEWARE & CERAMICS
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : FOSSILS
VIRTUAL MUSEUM : COINS
  - Back to Virtual Museum - Main Index  
 


  Gold pendant from Sharjah. 2nd Millennium BC A Bronze Age cornelian bracelet from Ras al-Khaimah A bronze bracelet with leopard head decorations, from Jebel Buhays, Sharjah. Iron Age Traditional Bedu silver necklace with beads. 19th or 20th Century AD Traditional Bedu silver jewellery. 19th or 20th Centruy A gold and electrum pendant from Dhayah, around 1800 - 1500 BC